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Straighten Up! 9 Tips for Better Posture

Posted by Dan Buda on November 10, 2017 in Blog

Personal Trainer in Oxford , Bloxham and Witney, Dan Buda talks about posture and ways to improve it . Article talks about “slump at your desk”, ” text neck” and exercise to help your posture .

Don’t Be a Slouch

It adds to the stress on your spine. That puts a strain on the bones, muscles, and joints you need to hold your backbone in place. But lousy posture isn’t just bad for your back. A constant slump smashes your inside organs together, and makes it harder for your lungs and intestines to work. Over time, that’ll make it hard to digest food or get enough air when you breathe.

Straighten Up

A great way to prevent bad posture problems? Stand up tall. You’ll feel better and look better — slimmer, even. Pretend you’re standing against a wall to measure your height. Hold your head straight and tuck in your chin. Your ears should be over the middle of your shoulders. Stand with your shoulders back, knees straight, and belly tucked in. Don’t let your booty or hips stick out. Straighten up so you feel like your head stretches toward the sky.

Don’t Slump at Your Desk

It’s comfy to slouch — maybe even lean back and swivel a bit. But it’s a posture no-no. Try this instead: Sit all the way back in your chair. Place a small, rolled-up towel or lumbar cushion behind your mid-back to protect your spine’s natural curve. Bend your knees at a right angle and keep them the same height, or a bit higher, than your hips. Place your feet flat on the floor.

Beware of ‘Text Neck’

On your smartphone all day long? Take a minute to stretch your neck. When you tilt your head down to check messages it really strains your spine. Over the course of a day — or year — that can add up. For a better view, lift the phone up and move your eyes, not your head.

Don’t Be a Low-Rider

Sure, it’s cool and comfy to recline during a long drive. But it isn’t great for your posture. Instead, pull your seat close to the steering wheel. Try not to lock your legs. Bend your knees slightly. They should be at hip level or a tad above. Don’t forget to put a pillow or rolled-up towel behind you for support.

Save Heels for a Big Night Out

They might be a fashion yes, but they’re likely a posture no.  Pumps and stilettos thrust the base of your spine forward, which over-arches your back. That can change the way your backbone lines up and put pressure on nerves, which causes back pain. Sky-high shoes also put more weight on your knees. Choose a lower, chunky heel for daily wear.

Hit the bed  the Right Way

Naptime is no excuse to slack. Skip the soft, saggy mattress. Choose a firm one that helps hold your spine’s natural shape. Side sleeper? Bend your knees slightly but don’t hug them. Place a pillow under your head so it’s level with your spine. Back sleepers should ditch the thick pillow and opt for a small one under the neck.

Exercise and Tone Your Abs

Too many pounds around your belly puts added stress on your back. You need strong muscles to support your spine. A well-designed workout plan by Triumph Fitness will keep your body and spine in tip-top shape. And that’s important. Try non-impact exercises like pilates and stretching .

Check for Problems

You probably know if you slouch or not. If you aren’t sure, here’s a quick way to tell. Place the back of your head against a wall. Move your feet 6 inches out from the baseboard. Your tush should touch the wall. Your lower back and your neck should be about 2 inches from it. If not, talk to your personal trainer , therapist or  doctor about ways to improve your posture.

Is It Better to Exercise on an Empty Stomach?

Posted by Dan Buda on August 4, 2017 in Blog

Is It Better to Exercise on an Empty Stomach?

It turns out there may be something to the gym floor “bro science” of exercising on an empty stomach to fire up that coveted fat-burning metabolism. Research published in the March 2017 edition of the American Journal of Physiology–Endocrinology and Metabolism shows that eating versus fasting before a workout can affect gene expression in adipose tissue (your fat stores) in response to exercise.

In the study, British scientists had a small group of overweight men walk at 60% of their maximum oxygen intake for 60 minutes in the morning either in a fasted or a fed state (a carb-rich meal 2 hours before exercise). The research team collected adipose tissue samples before exercise and again 1 hour afterward.

It turned out that adipose gene expression differed between the two trials. In the fasted state, an uptick in genes (specifically two called PDK4 and HSL) indicated an increase in the use of stored fat to fuel metabolism. When subjects exercised after eating, these genes decreased, which could indicate less fat-burning.

After eating, the researchers suggested, our adipose tissue is affected by the food and will not respond in the same way. The upshot is that for people who are eager to shed a few fat pounds, working up a sweat in a fasted state may bring about more favorable metabolic changes in adipose tissue to help treat Buddha-belly.

Still, it remains to be determined whether this outcome would apply to more intense bouts of exercise. Many people find it challenging to keep up the pace in a vigorous workout when their stomach is growling—and if pace suffers, calorie burning will drop overall. It’s important to note that we’re talking fat-burning here, not performance.

Personal trainer in Oxford Dan Buda , talks about different foods which can affect your mood.

Posted by Dan Buda on July 10, 2017 in Blog

Personal trainer in Oxford Dan Buda , talks about different foods which can affect your mood.

Say No to Ice Cream, Say Yes to Berries

As much as you may want to, you can’t make yourself feel better with a bowl of your favourite ice cream. It won’t help — the problem is all that sugar. Spikes in your blood sugar can bring on changes in your hormone levels. They can start with “jitteriness” and eventually lead to crashes. But other foods may help boost your mood.

Berries

These have lots of antioxidants, which help protect your cells from stress and may help ease feelings of anxiety. You can get them from nuts, beans, walnuts, or green vegetables, too.

Spinach

If this one leaves a bad taste in your mouth, almost any leafy green will do — kale, collard greens, or Swiss chard. The key is the magnesium, which may help you feel calmer. Make sure you get enough of that mineral to help keep things in check.

Oatmeal

This is a complex carb — it gets into your system slowly and gives you a steady flow of energy that can help keep you on an even keel. It also can give you a boost of a brain chemical called serotonin that can lift your mood.

Dark Chocolate

The flavonoids in the cocoa help protect your cells. They’re a type of antioxidant that may also help lower your blood pressure, boost the blood flow to your brain and heart, and make you less anxious. The dark stuff — at least 70% cocoa — is best, but don’t overdo it. The caffeine in chocolate can make anxiety worse if you have too much, and no one needs a lot of extra fat and calories.

Oysters

The zinc in these saltwater mollusks may help boost your mood. If oysters aren’t your thing, you can get it from cashews, liver, beef, or eggs, too.

Oranges

You may think of vitamin C when you think of these citrus fruits, and that’s a big reason it might help your anxiety. Studies have shown that a diet rich in it may help calm you and put you in a better frame of mind.

Sardines

These little fish aren’t for everyone, but they have lots of omega-3 fatty acids, which may help with depression and anxiety. The reason for that may be related to the way they can ease inflammation. If sardines are too fishy for you, try salmon or albacore tuna, which are lighter but also have plenty of omega-3s.

Coffee

This one can be a blessing or a curse — the issue is the caffeine. A couple of cups of black coffee a day may boost your mood and energy, and up to four cups seems to be OK for most people. But more than that can make you jittery and anxious, and some people are more sensitive to it.

Tea

For some, the ritual of a cup of tea has a calming effect. Certain herbs — lavender and chamomile, for example — may help, too, along with the antioxidants in the tea leaves themselves. Just make sure you don’t get too much caffeine. Many teas have that, too.

Sauerkraut

Cabbage has folic acid, vitamin C, and some B vitamins that may help ease anxiety. If it’s left to ferment — stew in its own juices — bacteria break down sugar and other things and make it taste sour. These “good” bacteria help keep your gut healthy. They also play a part in making serotonin, a calming brain chemical.

Liver

Calf is best, but chicken liver works, too. Both are loaded with B vitamins and folic acid that help make brain chemicals that affect the way you feel. You can get B vitamins from avocados and almonds, but they don’t have B12, which affects your mood and energy level. If you’d rather pass on the liver, you can get B12 in eggs, fish, or chicken.

16 ways to lower your cholesterol

Posted by Dan Buda on June 8, 2017 in Blog

Personal trainer Dan Buda, talks about 16 Tips to Lower Your Cholesterol

Simple Steps Add Up to lower cholesterol

Has your doctor said you have high cholesterol? Then you know you need to change your diet and lifestyle to lower cholesterol and your chance of getting heart disease. Even if you get a prescription for a cholesterol drug to help, you’ll still need to change your diet and become more active for heart health. Start with these steps.

1. Know Good and Bad

Your body needs a small amount of cholesterol. But many people have too much, especially the “bad” kind, or LDL cholesterol. That can happen if you eat too much saturated fat, found mainly in foods from animals. If your LDL level is too high, plaque can build up in your heart’s arteries and lead to heart disease. The “good” cholesterol, HDL, helps clear LDL from your blood.

2. Use Your Hands

It’s easy to eat too much, especially when you eat out and the portions are huge. That can lead to weight gain and higher cholesterol. What’s a true portion? There’s a “handy” way to tell. One serving of meat or fish is about what fits in your palm. One serving of fresh fruit is about the size of your fist. And a snack of nuts or serving of cooked vegetables, rice, or pasta should fit in your cupped hand.

3. Think Delicious and Nutritious

Load your plate with fruits and vegetables — aim for five to nine servings each day — to bring down your LDL level. Antioxidants in these foods may provide the benefit, along with fiber. And you may eat less fatty food if you fill up on produce. Bonus: You’ll also help lower blood pressure and keep your weight in check.

4.Boost Your Omega-3s

You can eat fish twice a week. It’s a great source of protein and omega-3s, which are a type of fat your body needs. Omega-3s help lower levels of triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood. They may also cut down on cholesterol, slowing the growth of plaque in arteries. Go for fatty fish, such as salmon, tuna, trout, and sardines. Grill, roast, bake, or broil, but don’t fry them.

5. Start Your Day With Whole Grains

A bowl of oatmeal is a smart choice. It fills you up, making it easier not to overeat at lunch. The fiber also curbs LDL cholesterol. Whole grains aren’t just for breakfast. You’ve got plenty of options to try later in the day, such as brown or wild rice, popcorn, and barley.

6. Go Nuts

Need a snack? A handful of almonds, pecans, pistachios, walnuts, or other nuts is a tasty treat. They are high in monounsaturated fat, which lowers LDL “bad” cholesterol but leaves HDL “good” cholesterol alone. Studies show that people who eat about an ounce of nuts a day are less likely to get heart disease. Keep the portion small, so you limit fat and calories. And avoid those covered in sugar, chocolate, or a lot of salt.

7. Make It Unsaturated

You need some fat in your diet, but probably less than you think. Plus, the type of fat matters. Unsaturated fats — like those found in canola, olive, and safflower oils — lower LDL “bad” cholesterol levels and may help raise HDL “good” cholesterol. Saturated fats — like those found in meat, full-fat dairy, butter, and palm oil — raise LDL cholesterol. Remember, good fats have just as many calories, so use just a bit.

8. Pick the Best Carbs

Beans and whole grains such as brown rice, quinoa, and whole wheat have more fiber and don’t spike your blood sugar. They will lower cholesterol and make you feel full longer. Other carbs, like those found in white bread, white potatoes, white rice, and pastries, boost blood sugar levels more quickly so you feel hungry sooner, which can lead you to overeat.

9. Go for 30

Just half an hour of physical activity 5 days a week can lower your bad and raise your good cholesterol levels. More exercise is even better. Being active also helps you reach and keep a healthy weight, which cuts your chance of developing clogged arteries. You don’t have to exercise for 30 minutes straight. You can break it up into 10-minute sessions. Or go for 20 minutes of harder exercise, like running, three times a week.

10. Walk It Off

It’s simple, convenient, and all you need is a good pair of shoes. Aerobic exercise (“cardio”) such as brisk walking lowers the chance of stroke and heart disease, helps you lose weight, keeps bones strong, and is great for your mood and stress management. If you’re not active now, start with a 10-minute walk and build up from there.

11. Go Beyond the Gym

You can be active anywhere. Garden, play with your kids, hike, dance, walk your dog — if you’re moving, it’s good! Even housework goes on the list if it gets your heart rate up. Do as much as possible, as often as you can, wherever your day takes you.

12. Be Smart When You Eat Out

Restaurant food can be loaded with saturated fat, calories, and sodium. Even “healthy” choices may come in supersize portions. To stay on track:

•Choose broiled, baked, steamed, and grilled foods — not fried.

•Get sauces on the side.

•Ask for half of your meal to be boxed up before you get it.

13. Check the Label

What’s the serving size? The nutrition info may look good, but does the package contain two servings instead of one?

If it says “whole grain,” read the ingredients. Whole wheat or whole grain should be the first one.

Note the saturated fat, sodium, calories, and cholesterol. Are they OK for your daily plan? If not, what will you choose to change?

14. Stay Chill

Over time, out-of-control stress becomes a problem. It raises your blood pressure, and for some people, it might mean higher cholesterol levels. Make it a priority to relax. It can be as simple as taking some slow, deep breaths. You can also meditate, pray, socialise with people you enjoy, and exercise. And if some of the things that stress you out are things you can change, go for it!

15. Check Your Weight

Extra pounds make you more likely to get high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes. These all affect the lining of your arteries, making them more likely to collect plaque from cholesterol. Losing weight, especially belly fat, raises your good and lowers your bad cholesterol.

16. Keep Tabs

Celebrate your progress! Remember that you’re in charge of your health and that you can turn your cholesterol around. See your doctor regularly so you know how it’s going. Working together, you’ll keep your heart going strong.

15 Things That Slow Your Metabolism

Posted by Dan Buda on June 3, 2017 in Blog

 Dan Buda , Personal trainer in Oxford talks about few things that can can slow your metabolism.

 

1. Your Genes

Metabolism is how your body changes food into energy. If your body is slow at burning calories while you rest or sleep, you probably got that from your parents, through your genes.

What you can do: Since you can’t change your genes, focus on your habits. One of the best ways to pep up your metabolism is to get more exercise. Look for ways to sneak more activity into your day.

2. Hormones

A shift in your hormones can put the brakes on your body’s energy use. That can make you tired. Some conditions, like an underactive or overactive thyroid and diabetes, are hormonal diseases that affect your metabolism. Stress also releases hormones that can trigger a slow-down.

What you can do: If you have a medical condition, keep up with your treatment. And make it a priority to nip stress in the bud.

3. Your Lack of Sleep

Good shut-eye helps your metabolism stay steady. When you toss and turn night after night, it’s harder for your body to use energy well, which can make conditions like diabetes and obesity more likely.

What you can do: Most adults need 7-9 hours of sleep. If you’re not there now, try it for a week and see how much better you feel.

4. Strict Diets

How you lose weight matters. If you don’t eat enough, your metabolism switches to slow-mo. Severe diets, especially when you also exercise, teach your body to make do with fewer calories. That can backfire, because your body clings to those calories, which makes it harder to take weight off.

What you can do: Although it may take longer, keep your weight-loss plan realistic, not drastic.

5. Trendy Salt

Sea salt is a darling for foodies and chefs. You’ll find it in top restaurants and gourmet kitchens. But it lacks iodine, which your thyroid needs to manage your metabolism.

What you can do: Just a dash of iodized table salt meets that need. Or enjoy an iodine-rich food, like shrimp.

6. Water

Without enough H2O, your metabolism can stall. How about a tall, cool glass of water? Some studies show that it helps the body burn energy and fuels weight loss. At any temperature, water also helps you fill up, so you eat less.

What you can do: Sip it throughout the day. You also can eat more foods that are naturally rich in water, such as watermelon or cucumbers.

7. You Drink Decaf

It’s a good option if you like a cup before bedtime. But you’ll miss out on the jolt of caffeine that gets your metabolic motor running. Remember that some research shows coffee can affect blood sugar levels. So you may need to limit it if you have diabetes.

What you can do: If you can’t handle caffeine, lean into the other tips in this slideshow. Many things can help your metabolism, and you’ll want to use as many of them as possible.

8. Not Enough Calcium

You need it for more than your bones. It’s also a key nutrient for a swift metabolism, among the other positive things it does for your body. Many people don’t get enough of it.

What you can do: There are many delicious options! You can get calcium from milk and dairy products, of course. It’s also in many fortified foods (such as cereals, orange juice, and soy or almond milk), canned salmon, turnip greens, kale, and tofu.

9. Your Thermostat Is Set Too High

It’s not always a good idea to heat things up in the bedroom — at least not when it comes to your metabolism. Room temperatures of 75 degrees keep your body from making brown fat, which is loaded with calorie-burning cells.

What you can do: Turning the thermostat down to 66 degrees before bedtime boosts brown-fat levels. When it’s cold outside, taking regular brisk walks also may do that.

10. Your Meds

Some drugs can slow down your metabolism. These include many antidepressants and certain antipsychotics doctors use to treat schizophrenia. Many other medications, like those that slow the heart rate, also can have that effect.

What you can do: Let your doctor know if you think your prescriptions might be a problem. There may be something you could take instead.

11. Cutting Carbs

Sure, easing up on unhealthy carbohydrates can help you manage your weight and burn fat faster. But your body needs them to make insulin. Go low-carb all the time and you make less of this key hormone. Your metabolism stalls and you don’t burn as many calories as you once did.

What you can do: Get your carbs from fruits, vegetables, and grains that are rich in nutrients, like sweet potatoes and whole wheat flour. They’ll keep your metabolism in check and head off those cravings that can take you off-track.

12. Being Nocturnal

Catching the red-eye flight or working the night shift messes with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle. Those changes can lead to a sluggish metabolism and other problems like diabetes and obesity.

What you can do: Reset your body clock. If you take a lot of red-eye flights, get a different departure time. If you work at night and can’t change, talk to your doctor about healthy ways you can get on track.

13. Changing Meal Times

When you eat is as important as what you eat.  Skipping meals or grabbing a bite on the go creates social — and metabolic — jet lag. Shifting meal times can wreak havoc with your metabolism and raise your risk for heart disease.

What you can do: Consider a regular mealtime with your family, and stick to it.

14. Chronic Stress

When you are in a stressful situation, your body makes a hormone called cortisol. It’s meant to give you a quick boost of energy. But if you’re stuck in a stressed-out zone, the body thinks you still need to fight, so it keeps making cortisol. High levels of this hormone make it harder for your body to use insulin. That puts the brakes on your metabolism and fuels weight gain.

What you can do: Find ways you can de-stress. Breathe deep. Do something you love. Find what works for you.

15. A High-Fat Diet

Eating loads of fatty foods like greasy burgers and buttery goodies is never a healthy idea. It changes how your body breaks down foods and nutrients. Your body’s ability to use insulin is affected, too. That’s called insulin resistance, and it’s been linked to obesity and diabetes.

What you can do: Reach for more fruits and vegetables, and drink more water. Beans, peppers, and shellfish are good options, too.

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Bleinheim triathalon 2017- Thank you Dan ! Thank you Dan for training me for this event . it was really great and i am so happy that i have done it. Thank you for being so dedicated to my  3 months of training and i could not have done it without you. blenheim triathlon 2017

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